How to Invest Money: A Simple Guide to Grow Your Wealth in 2019

Posted by BrahimAB on juillet 26, 2019 with No comments
Figuring out how to invest money can be a real challenge. And I’m sure you’ll agree with me when I say: There’s certainly no shortage of information on investing available in the digital age. However, too much information can be overwhelming. Right? That’s why we made a guide to help you get a solid grasp of investing. It’s the perfect resource for beginners who want to start investing money in order to reach their financial goals. We structured the information in a way that is comprehensive yet not overly complicated. Outlined below you will find everything you need to know to start investing and begin preparing yourself financially for the future.

How to Invest Money

When figuring out how to invest money, it’s best to start with the basics. I’m sure any financial advisor will agree with that.
These basics include setting the goal of your investments and determining where to invest money to best achieve each goal.

Investing Money for Beginners

When you invest money, what you are doing is either buying a portion of a company or a commodity with the belief that the value of that company or commodity will grow over time.
Don’t forget:
Investing is not a get-rich-quick scheme, but rather a way to consistently grow the wealth you already have. The good news is that even though investing is a way to grow your wealth, you don’t have to have a lot of money to get started.
Compounding interest dictates that even small sums of money can be turned into fortunes over time, providing you select the right investments.

Where Should I Invest Money?

When deciding where you should invest your money, you’ve got plenty of options. These options include:

1. The Stock Market

The most common and arguably most beneficial place for an investor to put their money is into the stock market.
When you buy a stock, you will then own a small portion of the company you bought into.
When the company profits, they may pay you a portion of those profits in dividends based on how many shares of stock you own.
When the value of the company grows over time, so do the price of the shares you own, meaning that you can sell them at a later date for a profit.
Other investment options include:

2. Investment Bonds

When you purchase a bond, you are essentially loaning money to either a company or the government (for US investors, this is typically the US government, though you can buy foreign bonds as well).
The government or company selling you the bond will then pay you interest on the “loan” over the duration of the bond’s lifecycle.
Bonds are typically considered ‘less risky’ than stocks, however, their potential for returns is much lower as well.

3. Mutual Funds

Rather than buying a single stock, mutual funds enable you to buy a basket of stocks in one purchase. The stocks in a mutual fund are typically chosen and managed by a mutual fund manager.
But here’s the kicker:
These mutual fund managers charge a percentage based fee when you invest in their mutual fund.
Most of the time, this fee makes it difficult for investors to beat the market when they invest in mutual funds. Also, most mutual fund investors don’t actually ever beat the stock market.

4. Savings Accounts

By far, the least risky way (and probably the worst way) to invest your money is to put it in a savings account and allow it to collect interest.
However, as is usually the case, low risk means low returns. The risk when putting your money into a savings account is negligible, and typically, there are little to no returns.
Still, savings accounts play a role in investing as they allow you to stockpile a risk-free sum of cash that you can use to purchase other investments or use in emergencies so you don’t touch your other investments.

5. Physical Commodities

Physical commodities are investments that you physically own, such as gold or silver. These physical commodities often serve as a safeguard against hard economic times.

Best Ways to Invest Money in Your 20’s

It’s never too early to start investing. In fact, just a few years of a head start can often lead to hundreds of thousands of dollars more money by the time you retire.
When you’re investing in your 20s, it’s best to start out by focusing on paying off any debt you may have such as student loans or credit-card debt.
Debt works just the opposite of investments, exponentially decreasing your wealth rather than exponentially growing it, so it’s a good idea to make getting debt-free your first and foremost goal.
Once you have your debt under control, start researching the stock market and investing as much as you can.
Take in as much information as you are able, and start highlighting quality companies that you believe will grow in value over time.
In case you’re wondering:
We’ll talk later about how to find good investments, but for now, know that once you have a few companies chosen, it doesn’t matter how much or how little you are able to invest.
It’s always a good idea to invest as much as you are able, but if you start in your 20s investing as little as a few thousand dollars a year, you will be well on your way to preparing for retirement.

How to Invest Money to Make Money

Many people view investing as a form of income, and some are quite successful at making a living by trading stocks.
This is the most glamorized form of investing, however, it isn’t the type of investing that most people benefit from. Most people benefit from long-term investing. This involves letting your money compound in the stock market over 10 and 20 years.
Long-term, value investing is how people retire rich.

Best Way to Invest Money Short-Term

Short-term investors make money by trading in and out of stocks over a short period of time rather than buying and holding them for several years.
While you certainly can make money doing this, the problem is that no matter how skilled at trading you become, there will always be a big element of luck involved.
Consider this:
For beginner investors, short-term trading comes down almost entirely to luck, and you can easily lose as much or more than you profit.
Rather than thinking about investing as a way to make short-term gains, it’s better to think of investing as a way of making long-term gains.
Keep in mind that you’re still making money either way.
With long-term investing, though, you are able to minimize your risk and negate the sometimes-crushing effects of short-term volatility and price-drops.